Celebrations

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Oak Ridge Boys New Down Home Christmas Album

The Oak Ridge Boys Announce New Christmas Album

Produced By Dave Cobb, ‘Down Home Christmas’ Will Be Available October 25th

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – GRAMMY® Award-winning and Country Music Hall of Fame members, The Oak Ridge Boys, will once again celebrate the Christmas season with their timeless hits and holiday classics on their 2019 Down Home Christmas Tour. The Oak Ridge Boys will perform over thirty-one concerts and are set to kick-off on November 13th in Branson, Missouri, playing in 28 cities and 14 states across the U.S. In conjunction with the tour, the Oaks’ latest Christmas album, Down Home Christmas, produced by Dave Cobb, will be released by Lightning Rod Records/Thirty Tigers on October 25, 2019.

Each year The Oak Ridge Boys travel all over the United States spreading Christmas cheer by performing Christmas classics, new favorites and many of the hits that shaped the career of this legendary group. The Oak Ridge Boys’ set list will take audiences on a hit-filled musical journey of holiday cheer from the group’s seven best-selling Christmas albums, along with songs from the new Down Home Christmas Album, which includes standards such as “Amazing Grace” and “Silent Night,” but also new favorites such as “Don’t Go Pullin’ On Santa Claus Beard” written by Americana hit-maker Anderson East and “South Alabama Christmas,” written by Jamey Johnson.

“Down Home Christmas began much like the other seven Christmas albums we have recorded. But things changed. Most of the songs I had collected were put on the shelf, and we started looking for songs that addressed specific subjects related to Christmas,” says The Oaks’ Duane Allen. “Dave Cobb was the producer/coach/motivator for this project. He encouraged us to dig a little deeper into our souls, to capture the magic of each song. With very simple instrumentation, the four Oak Ridge Boys’ voices are out front, and in your face, with the awesome, huge sound of RCA Studio A wrapped around, but not over-powering it.”

“Down Home Christmas is a project that we are happy to share with the world and, rest assured, you will hear these songs on our upcoming 30th annual Christmas tour,” says Joe Bonsall. “The instrumentation is sparse, yet incredibly put together, and the vocals are rich and vibrant. Many of the songs were freshly written by a stable of Nashville’s top songwriters.”

Down Home Christmas marks the Oaks’ 30th annual Christmas tour, eighth Christmas album, and third album collaboration with producer Dave Cobb.

Track Listing:
1. The Family Piano (Aaron Raitiere)
2. Angels (Aaron Raitiere)
3. Bring Daddy Home For Christmas (Channing Wilson, Aaron Raitiere)
4. Reindeer On The Roof (Jake Mitchell, Aaron Raitiere)
5. Silent Night (Franz Xaver Gruber, Joseph Mohr)
6. Hallelujah Emmanuel (Robert Jason, Paul Bradley Jr.)
7. Down Home Christmas (Mando Saenz, Aaron Raitiere)
8. South Alabama Christmas (Jamey Johnson)
9. Don’t Go Pullin’ On Santa Claus’ Beard (Anderson East, Aaron Raitiere)
10. Amazing Grace (John Newton)

The group—Joe Bonsall, Duane Allen, William Lee Golden and Richard Sterban—are best known for their iconic and multi-platinum hit “Elvira,” along with other chart-toppers like “Bobbie Sue,” “Thank God For Kids,” “Y’All Come Back Saloon,” and “American Made.” The Oak Ridge Boys have achieved a decorated career, winning five GRAMMY® Awards, multiple CMA, ACM and Dove Awards for their crossover brand of pop, country and gospel music that spans multiple generations. The Oak Ridge Boys became members of the Grand Ole Opry in 2011 and achieved arguably country music’s highest honor in October 2015 when they were inducted into the Country Music Hall Of Fame.

 – 2911 Media

Lee Greenwood’s 4th of July Collection Available Now

Just In Time for July 4th, ‘The Lee Greenwood Collection’

Lee Greenwood, is celebrating the release of ‘The Lee Greenwood Collection’ in Kirkland’s, Hobby Lobby and select retailers nationwide. ‘The Lee Greenwood Collection,’ in partnership with Trade Cie, LLC, includes patriotic home decor with some of Greenwood’s iconic “God Bless the U.S.A” lyrics.

“So many veterans, military families and just all around patriotic fans have told me how lyrics like “I’m proud to be an American where at least I know I’m free” or ‘The Flag still stands for freedom” truly mean to them. So, we took those words and created some beautiful pieces that exemplify that song. I’m really proud of this collection and hope it brings a sense of warmth and patriotism to your home,” Greenwood said.

Greenwood, who was recently named one of Billboard’s 100 Greatest Country Artists of All Time, performed during President Donald Trump’s inauguration. Previously, Greenwood sang during President Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush’s ceremonies.

 – CMTT

Inspirational Short Story For Mothers Day This Day

crying girlAn Inspirational Short Story For Mothers Day

A man stopped at a flower shop to order some flowers to be wired to his mother who lived two hundred miles away. As he got out of his car he noticed a young girl sitting on the curb sobbing. He asked her what was wrong and she replied, “I wanted to buy a red rose for my mother. But I only have seventy-five cents, and a rose costs two dollars.”

The man smiled and said, “Come on in with me. I’ll buy you a rose.” He bought the little girl her rose and ordered his own mother’s flowers. As they were leaving he offered the girl a ride home. She said, “Yes, please! You can take me to my mother.” She directed him to a cemetery, where she placed the rose on a freshly dug grave.

The man returned to the flower shop, canceled the wire order, picked up a bouquet and drove the two hundred miles to his mother’s house.

– TheHolidaySpot

Jack Blanchard’s Column: Being Alive

Jack Blanchard’s Column: Being Alive

BEING ALIVE

For some people the world changes so slowly they hardly notice it.
Things happen on a small familiar set, like a stage play.
For others of us,
our horizons have grown so far apart it’s hard to get our bearings.
If I ever do get back to my old neighborhood
I’m sure I’ll run into a guy I used to know
for whom nothing much has changed.

Reality is fluid. The scenery of life changes constantly.
There is only one thing we can depend on,
and that’s the thing we fear most: Change.
Relationships change, that’s for sure.
If we’re lucky they change into something better…
different, but better.

Misty is my full time family.
After all these years we still have lots to talk about,
and we make each other laugh..
Our occasional arguments last only minutes.

We were in a bad hurricane in Miami in the 60’s
The metal posts holding our carport were banging up and down
in the 135 mph wind.
A guy on the radio yelled “Holy crap! The back door just blew off!”
I said, “Isn’t he supposed to cheer US up?”

I was sitting by the window listening to the sound of emptiness.
This is not like listening to no sound at all,
because the sound of emptiness contains
all the things you hoped would be in it,
and all the sounds that once were.

ROGER MILLER. Roger Miller walked in on our session at Columbia.
I stopped everything and went to meet him.
I put my hand out and was going to say “I’m a fan of yours.”
Before I could, he said “I’m a fan of yours.”
A high spot of my life.

My grammar school was pretty strict,
but they gave us education on par with today’s colleges.
In seventh and eighth grades all us boys had to wear ties.
The result was grotesque but funny.
The most popular style was this:
A blue flannel checkered lumberjack shirt
and a bright red rayon clip-on tie with a picture of Popeye on it.

Make the days a little longer.
I don’t know where the time has flown.
Lord, I’m having such a good time,
I don’t want to go home.

Jack Blanchard

jackmistysunhat001

Jack Blanchard & Misty Morgan…

Home Page: http://www.jackandmisty.net Awards: Grammy, Billboard, CMA, BMI, ASCAP. Mastering & restoration studio: 352-530-2068.  Email: jackandmisty@gmail.com.

© Jack Blanchard,© 2007, 2012, 2019

“Auld Lang Syne”: What Does It Really Mean? 

“Auld Lang Syne”: what does it mean? 

Why do we sing it on New Year’s Eve, and what language is it?

This New Year’s Eve, it is almost inevitable that you will hear (and possibly try to sing) “Auld Lang Syne,” a song whose melody is synonymous with the new year (and the theme of change more broadly) in the English-speaking world, despite nearly incomprehensible syntax and vocabulary. The problem is that the text on which the song is based isn’t in English at all — it’s 18th-century Scots, a similar but distinct language responsible for lyrics in the song such as “We twa hae run about the braes / and pou’d the gowans fine” that are utterly incomprehensible to Americans.

But the story of how an 18th-century Scottish ballad became synonymous with the new year is tangled, involving both Calvinist theology’s traditional aversion to Christmas and the uniquely central role that watching television plays in American New Year’s celebrations. Bridging the gap is a once-famous, now-forgotten Canadian big band leader who for decades defined New Year’s Eve and transformed a Scottish folk custom into a global phenomenon.

“Should old acquaintance be forgot?” is a rhetorical question

As immortalized in When Harry Met Sally, a casual listener to the song is likely to be confused as to what the central opening lyric means:

Should Old Acquaintance be forgot,

and never thought upon;

The flames of Love extinguished,

and fully past and gone:

Is thy sweet Heart now grown so cold,

that loving Breast of thine;

That thou canst never once reflect

On old long syne?

We have here a series of rhetorical questions, all amounting to the point that unless you are completely dead inside, you should be able to appreciate the virtues of reconnecting with old friends and thinking about old times.

What is the meaning of “Auld Lang Syne?”

Americans are aware that Scottish people speak English with a distinctive accent, and may also be aware of the existence of a language called Scottish Gaelic that is related to Irish and Welsh and is rarely spoken. But there is also what is known as the Scots language, which has clear similarities to English without truly being intelligible to English speakers — in much the way that Italian and Spanish are similar, but distinct, languages.

The difference, of course, is that for hundreds of years now there has been no independent Scottish state to standardize and promote Scots as a formal language distinct from Scottish-accented English. Much of Irvine Welsh’s novel Trainspotting is written in Scots, and this lecture in Scots about Scots should give you a sense of its relationship to English:

The point is that the phrase “auld lang syne” is not recognizable to English speakers because it is not an English phrase. Translated literally it means “old long since,” but the meaning is more like “old times” or “the olden days.”

It happens to be the case that the phrase “should auld [i.e., old] acquaintance be forgot” is verysimilar in both English and Scots. And since conventionally only the first verse and the chorus are sung, the difference between the languages is not very salient except for the unfamiliar titular phrase. But if you delve into the later verses, it becomes clear that the song is not in English. Here’s the second verse, for example:

And surely ye’ll be your pint-stoup!

and surely I’ll be mine!

And we’ll tak’ a cup o’ kindness yet,

for auld lang syne.

Ye’ll be your pint-stoup? What?

When Harry Met Sally is right: It’s about old friends

As Meg Ryan’s character Sally says in the movie, this is a song about old friends.

The lyrics to the later verses, when translated into English, make this perfectly clear. The “pint-stoup” business is essentially saying, “Surely you’ll buy a pint and I’ll buy a pint and we’ll drink to the good old days.” In the next verse we hear about how “We two have run about the slopes / and picked the daisies fine.”

Old friends who haven’t seen each other in a while are meeting up again, having a drink, and reminiscing. If this were a song that you normally listened to in a quiet room at full length in English when sober, there would be no confusion. Since that’s basically the opposite of a New Year’s Eve party, which is when you usually hear the song, there is a lot of confusion. But the song itself is not especially complicated.

New Year’s is a big deal in Scotland

One reason a random Scottish folk song has come to be synonymous with the new year is that New Year’s celebrations (known as Hogmanay) loom unusually large in Scottish folk culture — so much so that Scotland’s official website has a whole Hogmanay section, which notes that, “Historically, Christmas was not observed as a festival and Hogmanay was the more traditional celebration in Scotland.”

That’s because the Scottish Reformation brought to power followers of a Calvinist branch of Protestant Christianity known as Presbyterians who didn’t really care for Christmas. Indeed, in 1640 the Scottish parliament went so far as to abolish Christmas vacation “and all observation thairof,” citing its roots in “superstitious observatione.” When theologically similar Puritans briefly ruled England as a result of the English Civil War, they also attempted to suppress all Christmas celebration. But Presbyterianism put down deeper roots in Scotland, leading Hogmanay to displace Christmas as the number one midwinter celebration.

Everyone likes a good party, and the end of one year and the beginning of the next seems like as good a thing to celebrate as anything else, so Scottish-inflected New Year’s celebrations — including the sentimental and appealingly nonspecific “Auld Lang Syne” — came naturally to the English-speaking world.

Canadian band leader Guy Lombardo made “Auld Lang Syne” an institution

From 1929 until 1976, first on radio and then on television, Americans tuned in to the New Year’s Eve broadcast by Guy Lombardo and the Royal Canadians, a big band act led by Lombardo, a Canadian whose parents immigrated from Italy. By the mid-70s, Lombardo’s broadcasts began to face serious competition from Dick Clark’s “New Year’s Rockin’ Eve,” which was positioned to attract younger viewers and emphasized the rock element to contrast with the Royal Canadians’ big band tunes. But for decades, Lombardo owned December 31 — even earning the nickname “Mr. New Year’s Eve” — and every single year he played “Auld Lang Syne” to ring in the new year.

Lombardo didn’t write the song or invent the tradition of playing it to celebrate the new year, but the unusual television-centricity of North American observation of the holiday meant that his decision to play “Auld Lang Syne” turned it from a tradition into the tradition. (It could be worse — in Sweden people celebrate Christmas by watching Donald Duck cartoons.)

Then because of the influence of American movies and television shows on pop culture all around the world, conventional depictions of people ringing in the new year to “Auld Lang Syne” were beamed into living rooms globally. An 18th-century Scottish ballad thus became a midcentury American television ritual, and from there became a worldwide phenomenon — even though almost nobody understands the song.

 – By 

Jack’s Column: Nothing Is Over Like Christmas

jackcolumn2016Jack Blanchard’s Column: Nothing Is Over Like Christmas

Nothing is over like Christmas.
Months of anticipation, and then it’s gone.
Try to hold on to it and it slides away like this morning’s dream.

People who tell us that it’s a pagan holiday,
just because it’s near the winter solstice,
may not realize what an intrusion that is upon our enjoyment.
We can each bring our own thoughts to the season,
and make it our personal non-pagan celebration.
It’s in the spirit of the beholder.

It’s hard to work up the spirit here in Florida,
but we give it a shot every year.
Misty decorates a tree,
and puts Christmas stuff all over the place.
We listen to Christmas music with the air conditioning on
and with palm trees lurking in the yard.

Television doesn’t help, with reports of all night sales,
talking heads urging us to be good consumers,
stranded travelers sleeping in airports,
and carolers singing “Happy Honda Days”.

I toss up futile prayers for snow here in the subtropics,
but this is the time of year
when we just get a cheap imitation of early autumn.
A couple of trees around here get a touch of red,
and I go look at them.

I get sentimental about Christmas,
probably because I had real Christmasy holidays years ago,
with folks who are no longer with us,
and my childish subconscious thinks it will happen again.

I think next year I’ll write a letter to Santa,
and ask him for one more snowfall in Buffalo,
where the night is silent, the homes are warm,
and Christmas is strong in the air.

 

Jack Blanchard

jackmistysunhat001

Jack Blanchard & Misty Morgan…

Home Page: http://www.jackandmisty.net Awards: Grammy, Billboard, CMA, BMI, ASCAP.

Mastering & restoration studio: 352-530-2068.  Email: jackandmisty@gmail.com.

Copyright © Jack Blanchard 2007, 2015.

2018 AirplayExpress Top 40 Christmas Heroes Chart

Official 2018 AirplayExpress Top 40 Christmas Tunes

Biggest Christmas Tunes on AirplayExpress as Downloaded by DJ’s and Radio

These are the songs that were downloaded the most by Radio stations and Disc Jockeys from AirplayExpress this December for Radio Airplay And for adding to radio playlists for the same period. AirplayExpress thanks all the artists on the Top 40 for their support and faith in AirplayExpress. AirplayExpress is so proud that these artists  allowed us to send their songs out to radio during this Christmas Season. See below if your song was chosen for the 2018 Top 40 Christmas songs on AirplayExpress this 2018.

To see how your song fared during the 12 weeks running up to the Top 40 visit the 2018 Top 40 page on AirplayExpress at this link; https://www.airplayexpress.com/top-40-christmas2018/

 – WHISNews21

Jack Blanchard’s Column: A Winter Morning

jackcolumn2016

Jack Blanchard’s Column: A Winter Morning

By the time you read this it will not be current,
but I’m writing at the kitchen table on Christmas morning.
It’s a little chilly and the steam is swirling up from my coffee cup.
Carolers are singing softly and there are church bells.

I haven’t opened the curtains yet
but judging by the grayish light seeping through, it’s a winter day.
I haven’t heard any snow shovels, but it’s still early.
I think I’ll plug in the tree lights.

Even through the closed curtains
snow is visible in the corners of the windows.
Holly and candles add color to the room
and the silhouette of a Christmas wreath
can be seen at the front window.

As little as a couple of inches of overnight snowfall
can blow into deep white drifts,
so I feel around under the bed for my high top boots.
The ones with the knife pocket.

And I’d better get out my blue flannel shirt.
The checkered one.
That always feels good and warm on a winter’s morning
when the snow is squeaky cold.
We’d better hurry.
We’re due at Alan and Vivian’s house for Christmas dinner.

Funny, I can’t seem to find my high-tops,
or the flannel shirt,
or even my sheepskin mittens and earmuffs.
Grandma probably put them away somewhere.
I’ll ask her.

No, that’s right, I can’t ask her.
She’s not here. She’s been gone a long time.
Sometimes, especially at Christmas, I forget that.

I wonder what ever happened to those old winter clothes of mine.
Seems like I had ’em just the other day.
Or was it 20 years ago?

Got to go now, we’re late for dinner.
Don’t forget to turn off the tree lights and the air conditioner.
And, oh yes, the stereo Christmas music.

As I step out the door, Christmas presents under each arm,
the white glare makes my eyes water.
It could be snow. It really could!
But I feel the coral rock under my feet
as I step down from our motor home
and I hear the waves slapping against the shore a few feet to my left.

I wonder if they’re having snow up home.

Jack Blanchard

jackmistysunhat001

Jack Blanchard & Misty Morgan…

Home Page: http://www.jackandmisty.net Awards: Grammy, Billboard, CMA, BMI, ASCAP. Mastering & restoration studio: 352-530-2068.  Email: jackandmisty@gmail.com.

© Jack Blanchard,© 2007, 2012.

Jack Blanchard’s Column Follow the Bouncin Ball

jackcolumn2016

52000-intelligent-good-looking-readers

Jack Blanchard’s Column: Follow The Bouncin’ Balldividers_60

FOLLOW THE BOUNCIN’ BALL.

Got no reason, Got no rhyme. 
Kickin’ a can down the road o’ time. 
Follow the Bouncin’ Ball, Sing an old song. 
I don’t mind if you tag along. 
Saturday matinee, give away a funny book, free of charge. 
Also a CrackerJack.
Read “Red Ryder”, “Little Beaver”. 
Trade it for a Dizzy Dean baseball card. 
Down to the roundhouse, Look at the trains. 
Up on the rooftop, spottin’ airplanes. 
Follow the Bouncin’ Ball, Sing and old song. 
I don’t mind if you tag along. 
(Words & music by Jack Blanchard.)

Jack Blanchard & Misty Morgan…

Home Page: http://www.jackandmisty.net Awards: Grammy, Billboard, CMA, BMI, ASCAP.

Mastering & restoration studio: 352-530-2068.

Email: jackandmisty@gmail.com.

© Jack Blanchard, 2016.

Christmas Inspiration With Rhonnie Scheuerman

“Rhonnie Scheuerman’s Christmas Time Inspiration For All In Need This Morning”

ChristmasLeaves

A Sight our Grandchildren may never see.

Your Daily Devotions for The Day Before Christmas

Search me, O God, and know my heart; test me and know my anxious thoughts

jesuschristmas003

Here are two more reasons why spending time alone with God each day is important: 

1) To take spiritual inventory of your life. David prayed, ‘Search me, O God, and know my heart; test me and know my anxious thoughts. See if there is any offensive way in me, and lead me in the way everlasting’ (vv. 23-24). Note the words ‘anxious thoughts’ and ‘offensive way’. These are things you start to take stock of when you are in God’s presence. For example, are you growing daily in your spiritual walk? Are you allowing unconfessed sins to pile up in your life? How about your attitudes? In order to see yourself from God’s point of view, you have to face these questions in His presence and answer them honestly.

2) To commit each day to the Lord. The writer of Proverbs said,‘Trust in the Lord with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways acknowledge Him, and He will make straight your paths’ (Proverbs 3:5-6). Share your schedule with God, ask Him to guide you in your daily activities and alter them as needed. Ask Him to help you manage your time better so you can get more done (Psalms 90:12). Ask Him to help you distinguish between what’s truly important and what isn’t (1 Corinthians 10:23). Every day of your life you’ll have to deal with two things: problems and opportunities. And God will give you the right perspective and approach to handle both. You’ll be amazed how much more effective and efficient you are when you’ve spent time with Him.

Prayer
Heavenly Father,

search me Lord and reveal my heart and heal me. In Jesus’ Name

Jesus002Amen

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