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Latest Independent Artists Mp3 Download Releases

This Weeks Latest Independent Superstars (IDSS) Free Download Releases
Wildhorse Entertainment is proud to announce that they will be offering the following new releases by
Independent Artists as free promotional downloads to DJ’s and fans worldwide.
 
These Great New Hit Songs for the week of March 3 2012
Available For Free Promotional Download Compliments Of

Wildhorse Entertainment

And All The Artists Listed Below

Chuck Hancock – Heart Over Mind

Darren Rhodes – I Got Over You Two Beers Ago

Sins Country – Something You’ll Regret

Pat Roden – Get Back To Your Life

Ronel – Mama He’s Crazy

DeLon – Git

Jacob Lyda – When We Make Love

Ron Thompson – Singing By The River

 

These are some of the Best Independent Artists in the World today, please support them by downloading their songs
Our Wildhorse Independent Superstars Country TOP30 Download Chart Show is based solely on the amount of downloads each song gets during a full calendar month. This very popular show is Hosted by Ed Dailey and is now broadcast in Austria, Germany, Holland, South Africa and the USA for Wildhorse Entertainment
 
To download these great big Indpendent Superstar Hits click on banner below
Right Click on Artists banners below to download their hit songs

Barbara Rainey Quotes Destitute Man From Paris

Wildhorse Entertainment presents our weekly

“Independent Superstar Quote Spot”

Brought to you by Barbara Rainey.

 

“What seems to us as bitter trails are often blessings in disguise.”

Oscar Wilde

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Oscar Fingal O’Flahertie Wills Wilde (16 October 1854 – 30 November 1900)

An Irish writer and poet. After writing in different forms throughout the 1880s, he became one of London’s most popular playwrights in the early 1890s. Today he is remembered for his epigrams, plays and the circumstances of his imprisonment, followed by his early death. Wilde’s parents were successful Dublin intellectuals. Their son became fluent in French and German early in life. At university Wilde read Greats; he proved himself to be an outstanding classicist, first at Dublin, then at Oxford. He became known for his involvement in the rising philosophy of aestheticism, led by two of his tutors, Walter Pater and John Ruskin. After university, Wilde moved to London into fashionable cultural and social circles. As a spokesman for aestheticism, he tried his hand at various literary activities: he published a book of poems, lectured in the United States of America and Canada on the new “English Renaissance in Art”, and then returned to London where he worked prolifically as a journalist. Known for his biting wit, flamboyant dress, and glittering conversation, Wilde had become one of the most well-known personalities of his day. At the turn of the 1890s, he refined his ideas about the supremacy of art in a series of dialogues and essays, and incorporated themes of decadence, duplicity, and beauty into his only novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray (1890). The opportunity to construct aesthetic details precisely, and combine them with larger social themes, drew Wilde to write drama. He wrote Salome (1891) in French in Paris but it was refused a licence. Unperturbed, Wilde produced four society comedies in the early 1890s, which made him one of the most successful playwrights of late Victorian London.

At the height of his fame and success, while his masterpiece, The Importance of Being Earnest (1895), was still on stage in London, Wilde had the Marquess of Queensberry, the father of his lover, Lord Alfred Douglas, prosecuted for libel, a charge carrying a penalty of up to two years in prison. (Libel Act of 1843) The trial unearthed evidence that caused Wilde to drop his charges and led to his own arrest, and trial for gross indecency, with other men. After two more trials he was convicted and imprisoned for two years’ hard labour. In prison he wrote De Profundis (written in 1897 & published in 1905), a long letter which discusses his spiritual journey through his trials, forming a dark counterpoint to his earlier philosophy of pleasure. Upon his release he left immediately for France, never to return to Ireland or Britain. There he wrote his last work, The Ballad of Reading Gaol (1898), a long poem commemorating the harsh rhythms of prison life. He died destitute in Paris at the age of forty-six.

If you would like to comment on this Quote supplied to us by Barbara Rainey then you are most welcome to do so.

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